Low-Impact Gardening & Eating

It doesn’t feel right not to do any gardening on a weekend, even if the whole house has the plague sorry, flu.
The greenhouse provides a spot out of the wind, and in the late morning at the moment has direct sun as well.
So I rugged up and planted seeds of:

  • rocket
  • kale – squire
  • lettuce mignonette
  • mesclun mix
  • spring onions – bunching
  • onions – hunter river brown, borettana, red sheffield
  • spinach – winter giant, bloomsdale
  • chives

Wood Chip in Amgrow Seed Raising Mix


Admittedly some of the packs were rather ancient but you never know, I sowed generously to compensate. It saves the packs sitting there in the seedbox.
Note to self – do not buy Amgrow Premium Seed Raising Mix again, this bag had great lumping pieces of wood chip in it.

The other garden work I did this weekend was figuring out where the fruit trees (19! eek!) we have ordered are all going. As this involved sitting in bed with a cat it was very pleasant gardening. Across the front fence – 8 alternating dwarf apples and pears. On the side fence with Mary – two plums. Arranged somehow in the middle of the front garden – a fig and three dwarf apples sited to accommodate the magnolia, power line to the house, and two dwarf cherries already in place. The front garden is going to be a delicious forest of fruit come summer time. Over the back fence – two quinces, a kentish cherry, an almond, another apricot and one dwarf apple. We have placed the four closest to the road as the least attractive to eat off the tree – quince, kentish cherry and almond. The neighbourhood kids will have to scramble through those and down the slope to get at the apricots and apples which are against the fence. There’s enough to share anyhow. At this time of year I love watching the honeyeaters and other birds coming to feed on the apples I purposely leave on the tree for them. We don’t get possums or cockatoos being down in the valley so we can ‘share the surplus’ with the more delicate birds. Now the kittens are killers though the leftover fruit needs to be high up, not near the ground.

Harvest – the first lettuce from the hotbox! delicate and sweet.

The rabbits are working their way through last weekend’s prunings. They are quite methodical. If there are leaves on the tips they eat those first. On the second pass, they eat all the little nubs on the branches where the leaves/flowers will sprout from. On the third pass they eat the soft tips of twigs, and last but not least they carefully strip the bark from the woodier bits. And they turn their nose up at Apricot prunings, and do little happy rabbit nose twitching for Pear. Too cute.

Last weekend – pruned anzac peach, plum, granny smith apple, gala apple, williams pear.
Robin kept up work on the reshaping of the clothesline mound, we think we’ve figured out how to hold back the slope from the depredations of chicken scratching – using the off cuts from the chicken shed as small terracing bits. I potted on the remainder of the strawberry plants – now we have about 200 plants in our strawberry nursery, good for filling the gaps in the front garden.

Meatballs I did two weeks ago were magic for dinner one night this past week. They will be repeated. A number #20 jar with 20 meatballs was an ample feed for the three of us with extra passata over the top. Also a success – salsa soup – make a vat of regular vegie soup and toss in half a jar of salsa #3. Yum.

Notes for next winters harvest. At the moment we are mainly buying: potatoes, spinach, leeks, red onions, cabbage, sweet potato. We have enough from the garden of carrots, beetroot. Not quite enough broccoli – i think the seedlings may have suffered and production has not been good.

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